Bird printed tea towels

Our lino cuts at the William Morris Society came out so well I’ve been using them to print tea towels to sell in the gift shop.

teatowels06The fabric is medium-weight Belarusian linen, bought on one of my trips to Donetsk. I stitched the tea towels on my trusty 1956 Singer machine, printed, ironed, washed and ironed them again to make sure the colour stayed fast.    towel5towel1towel2towel4towel3Here are the first four so far, two of which sold on day one!  teatowels01teatowels03teatowels05 teatowels09teatowels08

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Pot, Plant

Finally! I’ve found some worthy tenants of my Christmas present, three pots made by Aunty Penny. In order of appearance: desert rose (from a cutting – hence the one massive leaf), aloe vera (offspring of our big plant which can’t stop cloning itself) and tiger begonia (also a present from Penny).plants3plants2plants1

Photogenic Drawings

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For Christmas, Sayed bought me some solar paper. This is light sensitive paper that you can use to produce monochrome images (called photograms) by placing objects on it, exposing it to bright sunlight for a while and then washing it in water (no darkroom chemicals needed). The photographer and inventor William Fox Talbot used a similar process in the 1840s to produce what he called ‘photogenic drawings’.

Now we’re having a few bright sunny days, I’ve been testing my solar paper out. It seems fitting to follow in the footsteps of the first female photographer, Anna Atkins – who used her images to illustrate a botanical guide – by starting with the houseplants.

More information on photograms can be found here on the Victoria & Albert Museum website.

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